Convicting traffickers

You might be wondering why girls and their families don’t file cases with the police or speak out in their communities about cases of trafficking. Border monitoring analysis done by one of our program partners, Tiny Hands Nepal, helps us to understand why. The highest reason reported is because the trafficker is a member of their community. Nepali people are very trusting and timid so when the trafficker is from their community, they don’t know what to do so remain silent. The second highest reason why incidents are often not reported is because of the reputation that the victim will have in their community. There is a stigma attached to girls and women who have fallen victim to traffickers or trafficking. They are often shut out of their homes and communities and left with an uncertain and unsafe future.

Interceptions are incredibly important in the fight against human trafficking and are saving girls before they are trafficked and lost forever. Convictions of traffickers in the court system save many more lives. Our partners, Tiny Hands Nepal and 3 Angels Nepal, work hard to file cases against traffickers and see them through to convictions and lengthy jail sentences. Currently there are many cases being fought in court with many traffickers convicted of trafficking and being sentenced. Everyday, we see the enormousness of this horrific violation of human rights yet there are also incredible wins in the fight against human trafficking.

 

INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Preying on Girls through Social Media

Kalindi (name changed for privacy and protection) thought she has found the love of her life online, only to find herself weeping with regret in the end.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

In Need of Safety and a Mother's Love

Mandeep (name changed for protection and privacy) had been through lots of hardships since she was a child - from losing her father, being abandoned, and taking on different jobs. She was found by our partner's staff sitting on a bridge, distressed and alone.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Fake Job Offer

Padmini (name changed for privacy and protection), 20, was spotted by our 3 Angels Nepal monitoring staff while doing their routine checks around the bus station. They saw her holding hands with a man but she seemed reluctant to go with him. Upon inquiry, they found out that Padmini didn’t know the man, so she was brought to a transit home where she shared her story.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Trafficked into India

Tamasi was being abused by her husband. Thinking that her new friend was genuinely concerned about her, she immediately agreed when she offered her work somewhere else.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Traffickers Convicted

In 2019, staff members from Tiny Hands Nepal intercepted four women in one of the borders and counseled them about the dangers of human trafficking. They also encouraged the women to file a case against their trafficker but they were reluctant to do so. With no case to process, they were sent home after the counselling. During the interview, our staff thought that one of the women seemed very suspicious. True enough, the same woman threatened the other girls that she wouldn't return their money and that they will be sent back abroad again.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Sold by Her Father

Muna worked as a dish cleaner in a hotel, but was forced to work for commercial sex. She eventually learned that she was sold by her father. Heartbroken and desperate to survive, she felt she had no choice but to endure being a sex worker. She suffered a lot satisfying the customers. Many times she tried to run away from but with no luck.