False Promise of Employment

Our partners estimate that over 15,000 women and children are trafficked out of Nepal each year. The presence of our teams in communities and at borders is critical in intercepting girls BEFORE this happens.

Because of our amazing and dedicated supporters, our partners in Nepal were able to intercept over 6,000 last year and have already intercepted over 3,800 so far this year.

Twenty-year-old Dolma lives with her younger sister and their 23-year-old cousin, Chamji [names changed]. Two men, who were living on the same floor of their building, suggested that if they worked in a foreign country, they would have better job opportunities and be able to earn around Rs 45,000 [US$380] per month. They even offered to help the girls travel abroad by paying for all their travel expenses. These two men were known for bringing girls into their flat in order to help them pursue foreign employment.

 Blindly trusting these two men, Dolma and Chamji handed over their passports, who then bought tickets for them to cross the border. He had told them that he would make all the necessary arrangements for their travel to New Delhi and from their, they would fly to Kuwait.

On their way to the border, they made plans to cross separately. Our partner, Tiny Hands, noticed something suspicious and stopped them for questioning. Chamji and the younger man were following them in another city rickshaw, but when they saw the staff stopping their friends, they quickly escaped.

 

At first, Dolma lied to the staff saying that she was married to the man, but later when staff members further questioned her at the shelter, she revealed the truth. The staff contacted Dolma’s family and discovered that they were unaware of her travel plans. A human trafficking case was filed against all the traffickers mentioned above, and Dolma is now staying at the shelter and awaiting further court procedures.

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INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Alone, Broken, and Shattered

Life has not always been easy for Saheli (name changed for protection) and her family however, with her father working hard, they still had a good life. When COVID-19 hit the world and Nepal went into lockdown, everything changed. Saheli’s father lost his job and so providing daily food for the family was difficult. In April, her world changed after meeting a man she knew as ‘uncle’.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Preying on Girls through Social Media

Kalindi (name changed for privacy and protection) thought she has found the love of her life online, only to find herself weeping with regret in the end.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

In Need of Safety and a Mother's Love

Mandeep (name changed for protection and privacy) had been through lots of hardships since she was a child - from losing her father, being abandoned, and taking on different jobs. She was found by our partner's staff sitting on a bridge, distressed and alone.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Fake Job Offer

Padmini (name changed for privacy and protection), 20, was spotted by our 3 Angels Nepal monitoring staff while doing their routine checks around the bus station. They saw her holding hands with a man but she seemed reluctant to go with him. Upon inquiry, they found out that Padmini didn’t know the man, so she was brought to a transit home where she shared her story.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Trafficked into India

Tamasi was being abused by her husband. Thinking that her new friend was genuinely concerned about her, she immediately agreed when she offered her work somewhere else.




INTERCEPT A GIRL AT THE BORDER | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Traffickers Convicted

In 2019, staff members from Tiny Hands Nepal intercepted four women in one of the borders and counseled them about the dangers of human trafficking. They also encouraged the women to file a case against their trafficker but they were reluctant to do so. With no case to process, they were sent home after the counselling. During the interview, our staff thought that one of the women seemed very suspicious. True enough, the same woman threatened the other girls that she wouldn't return their money and that they will be sent back abroad again.