Microfinance is keeping my kids in school

Mina was married at the age of 15. Now, at 32, her and her husband have a daughter and two sons. She was from a poor farming family. She tells us her story. “I started a ‘Chatpat’ (a quick sour, chilly snack) selling business with an investment of about Rs. 2,000 (US$17) as that’s all my family could afford. I was able to earn around Rs. 1,000 (US$8) daily and although this was not much, it boosted my confidence. That was 6 years ago. I wanted to grow my business but I wasn’t able to get a loan.”

“A year ago, I learned about the My Business My Freedom (MBMF) program through  the visit of Laxmi (MBMF Project Manager). She explained that there was an opportunity for me to grow my business with a microloan through this project and the interest rate was low. I joined a group of 10 other women like me. After some training and mentoring, I was given my first loan of Rs. 30,000 (US$260) to expand my business. My income has doubled since then. I have even begun to save little by little for my children’s future. My daily income is now about Rs. 2,000 (US$17). My daughter also helps me in the business. I am now confident that I will be able to send my children to school and complete their education and I am able to manage household expenses better than before. The lessons taught to me by Laxmi has been very helpful to manage personal financial needs too.”

“The My Business My Freedom project has changed my life and I feel motivated when Laxmi comes to us and encourages us. I will continue in this business and grow it for many years to come.”

The My Business My Freedom project gives women who are stuck in the cycle of poverty, the opportunity to become self-sustainable. This is an important part of helping reduce the risk of her and her children falling prey to trafficking. 

Project Partners

    

END POVERTY | MY BUSINESS - MY FREEDOM | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Persevering through Difficult Times

The situation in Nepal has been unstable since the start of pandemic - lockdowns implemented, schools and businesses closing, many becoming unemployed. Even our My Business My Freedom Program has gone through rough times, with some staff getting infected with COVID-19.




END POVERTY | MY BUSINESS - MY FREEDOM | NEPAL | STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING

MBMF Women Looking Forward to Reopening their Businesses

Sangita is one of the many women in My Business My Freedom program who have been affected by the pandemic and the series of lockdowns implemented in Nepal. Her business was going well until the lockdown was announced due to the second wave of COVID-19.




END POVERTY | HONOR 1000 - MICRO FINANCE PHILIPPINES | PHILIPPINES

Microfinance Women and Staff Supporting Each Other

Because of the pandemic, most of the Philippines has been placed on lockdown since last year. This has challenged our program to adapt and comply with the health protocols that each municipality has set. We are grateful to have a dedicated team who diligently visits each area and client.




END POVERTY | HONOR 1000 - MICRO FINANCE PHILIPPINES | PHILIPPINES

Uplifting Financial Literacy of Filipino Moms

The journey to sustainability varies for each of the client moms of Honor 1000's Microfinance Program. There are various factors and conditions contributing to this, but one thing remains unchanged and that is the support provided to these moms.




CHINA | END POVERTY | MY FIRST JOB PROGRAM

Getting ready to learn an employable skill

30 underprivileged women in rural Western China are getting excited about their opportunity to attend the next My First Job Assistant Chef Training Program. This successful program will see them move from being "furthest from employment" to earning stable incomes - many for the first time in their lives.




CHINA | END POVERTY | HUSKY ENERGY TAILORING SKILLS PROGRAM FOR WOMEN

Preparations for the 2021 Tailoring Program

Right now preparations are well underway for the 4th Husky (now part of the Cenovus group of companies) Tailoring Program for Women, Qinghai Province, China. Chosen from among many applicants, 30 women from underprivileged backgrounds will eventually be selected as the next group to commence their training.